Saturday, January 6, 2018

Esoteric significance of “Rāsa Līla”

(Lord Krishna’s blissful dance with the 10 Gopīs)
“Go” (cow) in Sanskrit also stands for the 10 senses.
Gopīs refer to the devotional inclinations of the mind (citta-vtti in Yoga) that control, guard, protect, nourish and herd our senses. Lord Krishna is the Supreme Lord of the senses (Hṛṣikeśa).
Rādhā Rāni (personified love and devotion) and her 9 attendants direct all our 10 senses away from the impermanent world towards the Lord of the Senses, the only Eternal Blissful One. When every sense is directed towards the Lord, who is the supreme abode of ultimate bliss, “rasa” (nectar of bliss) starts to flow from our heart into our life. This is the esoteric significance of Rāsa Līla (the Divine Play). This divine play is being played in everybody’s heart (vaikuntha), but only the devotees can partake in the bliss after becoming aware of it.” ………….The Great Upanishads - FB
Citta-vtti occurs in the very beginning  of Patañjali's  Yoga Sutra. This stanza says: “Yoga citta-vtti nirodhah” which means the essence of Ashtanga Yoga is the removal of the modification of consciousness. The method is defined through the eight limbed path in the Yoga Sutra of Patañjali. In the above passage the very attributes that are needed to modify the mind or consciousness is illustrated through a symbolism of the “Rāsa Līla”. Lord Krishna is seen dancing simultaneously with Radha as well as with all the nine Gopīs. This is because Radha and the Gopīs are an integral part but different dimensions of the very nature of the Divine. The symbolism of these attributes is explained below.
Rādhā, is the personification of devotion and worship which signifies a deep personal bond between the creator and the manifested. This is the reason that she is the primary escort of the Lord and dances in the very centre of the manifestation of consciousness in the created world. This also denotes the all-pervasive nature of the Divine consciousness as an integral part of the manifested consciousness.
Gopālī  is the personification of the authentic nourisher of the senses. In this world, we are constantly nourished and fed by maya or illusion through various perceptions which are rooted in purely the external objective attributes of a deeper consciousness. If we remain rooted at this level we are not in a position to appreciate the holistic and interconnected and integral nature of every objective manifestation.
Pālikā is the guardian, protector, nourisher and signifies the constant vigil and protection that is needed to lead us into the deeper nature of the manifest world to seek the Divine union.
Dhanyā is the personification of the blessed one who has been bestowed with Divine Grace or wisdom. To ascend from the Muladhara or the earthly domain to the Sahasrara or the cosmic domain, not only our personal effort of elevating our consciousness through sadhana or spiritual exercises is needed but the assistance of the Divine in drawing up our intention into its own bosom is very much needed.
Viśākhā is the symbolism of a branchless, singular and focused attribute. It is the laser sharp intensity that penetrates the thick koshas or covering in which the supreme consciousness lies buried within us.
Dhaniṣṭhikā is the symbolism of spiritual wealth which is acquired through various spiritual exercises and constant practice of any form of Yoga, namely; Bhakti, Karma, Jnana or Raja Yoga.
Anurādhā  symbolizes the one that follows in worship. This is the qualification which opens up the path which lies hidden to the lower levels of consciousness.
Somā  is the attribute of the reflected radiance, soothing like the moon light. This is the first stage of the living a Divine presence in one self. As the moon, which though in direct contact with the Sun, provides the soothing light to lovers in the world, when one reflects the Divine presence he or she becomes an instrument of bond of all creation to the Divine.
Ābhā is the personification of a spiritual adept who has gained the radiance to illuminate the spiritual path which leads to the portal of eternal bliss and
Tārakā is the one that leads to the other side of the river. She symbolizes the boatman of Siddhartha who tells him:
"The river is everywhere at the same time, at the source and at the the ocean and in the mountains, everywhere, and that the present only exists for it, not the shadow of the past, nor the shadow of the future...Siddhartha the boy, Siddhartha the mature man and Siddhartha the old man [are] only separated by shadows, not through reality...Nothing was, nothing will be, everything has reality and presence." …………Hermann Hesse in “Siddhartha”, Chapter 9.
Let this beautiful symbolism lead us to deeply understand the impermanence of the world and our own eternal nature.

Love to you all

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