Sunday, April 26, 2009

Knowledge of God

As man’s knowledge explodes in the twenty first century, the knowledge of God is increasingly finding an urgent need for redefining if human consciousness needs to evolve to the next higher level through an egalitarian spirituality.
In his book “The Human Side”, edited by Helen Dukas and Banesh Hoffman, Princeton University Press-1946, Einstein wrote:
“I cannot conceive of a personal God who would directly influence the actions of individuals, or would directly sit in judgment on creatures of his own creation. I cannot do this in spite of the fact that mechanistic causality has, to a certain extent, been placed in doubt by modern science. [He was speaking of Quantum Mechanics and the breaking down of determinism.] My religiosity consists in a humble admiration of the infinitely superior spirit that reveals itself in the little that we, with our weak and transitory understanding, can comprehend of reality.”

The main tension between the religious and the scientific community today is the view that one demands unconditional faith and the other a ‘cast in concrete’ proof through reasoning and experimental observation. While this may be the official position of the two warring factions in defining metaphysical attributes, there is a grudging acceptance that there is some validity of perception in each others camp.

The Catholic Church repositioned itself from a purely dogmatic domain through the insights of Pope John Paul II. In his famous document “Fides et Ratio - 1998” (Faith & Reason), he opens his encyclical with the following words:
“Faith and reason are like two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth; and God has placed in the human heart a desire to know the truth—in a word, to know himself—so that, by knowing and loving God, men and women may also come to the fullness of truth about themselves.” (cf. Ex 33:18; Ps 27:8-9; 63:2-3; Jn 14:8; 1 Jn 3:2).

Albert Einstein, the greatest scientific mind of the twentieth century writes about the value of mystical experience as being the foundation of true science in his book “The Merging of Spirit and Science” in the following words:
“The most beautiful and most profound experience is the sensation of the mystical. It is the sower of all true science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead. To know that what is impenetrable to us really exists, manifesting itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty which our dull faculties can comprehend only in their primitive forms - this knowledge, this feeling is at the centre of true religiousness.”

In his book “God Does Not Play Dice: The Fulfillment of Einstein’s Quest for Law and Order in Nature” by David A Shiang, he writes:

“The question of God is ultimately one of knowledge vs. ignorance, not faith vs. reason. It is possible to be reasonable and have faith at the same time.”

Hence let us all seek this true knowledge through inherent faith in our intuitive reasoning based on the cumulative wealth of scriptural and mystical revelations

Love to you all

2 comments :

  1. This entry TIBs, reminds me of a post I once gave titled, "Religion Sans Science is Bodiless - Science Sans Religion is Soulless". I will send the article for your guest writers column.
    Bhaskar

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  2. Thanks Bhaskar,
    I will upload your article in the 'Guest Authors Blog'

    ReplyDelete